8.03.2005

This week I will be finishing up a very lengthy sermon series (19 weeks) on Jesus' Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7). Wow. What a series this has been for me personally. I have learned so much and gained so much from the extra, concentrated time I've been able to spend on these three chapters.

I won't say that I have everything figured out. I don't. Some of it is still difficult to connect with (post!) modern life in places. Some of my conclusions were not perfectly satisfying to me, although all of them were more so than any of the others I could have proposed on some of the more difficult passages. This is when preaching is best for me -- when I can learn so much while (hopefully) helping others learn as well. My prayer is that what we've learned together as a church will come to fruition in our lives. That our knowledge will result in changed lives, changed relationships and a changing world.

I must give credit here to the most helpful commentary I have ever read on this passage. Dale C. Allison's The Sermon on the Mount: Inspiring the Moral Imagination is outstanding and easy to read. He brings sense to things that often appear to have no sense. He ties things together in ways that most other commentators miss or ignore. He provides background information to issues that no one else raises. Wonderful.

4 Comments:

At 6:54 PM, Anonymous Dan Boyce said...

Way to go Stacey, I also took some time with the Sermon on the Mount as part of a series on Matthew. I missed Allison's book but found Willard's "The Divine Conspiracy" very thought provoking. I'm not as concenened with with connecting Jesus' teaching with (post) modern life as much as raising my own and the congregations consciousness as to what makes us (post) modern thinkers and how the words of Scripture can be an effective critic of who we are, how we think, what makes us and our nieghbors tick. (Along these lines I have found Craig M. Gay's book, "The Way of the (modern) world Or, Why It's Tempting to Live AS If God Doesn't Exist"; Rifkin's "The Age of Access" and several of Postman's books helpful. But that's probably what you were after too. Blessings brother, Dan

 
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At 1:38 PM, Blogger bdrtthnnb said...

Way to go Stacey, I also took some time with the Sermon on the Mount as part of a series on Matthew. I missed Allison's book but found Willard's "The Divine Conspiracy" very thought provoking. I'm not as concenened with with connecting Jesus' teaching with (post) modern life as much as raising my own and the congregations consciousness as to what makes us (post) modern thinkers and how the words of Scripture can be an effective critic of who we are, how we think, what makes us and our nieghbors tick. (Along these lines I have found Craig M. Gay's book, "The Way of the (modern) world Or, Why It's Tempting to Live AS If God Doesn't Exist"; Rifkin's "The Age of Access" and several of Postman's books helpful. But that's probably what you were after too. Blessings brother, Dan

 

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